Author Archive for James D. Fernández

I’ll Be There: Film Festival Shows Legacy of the Lincolns

November 19, 2017
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<i>I’ll Be There: </i>Film Festival Shows Legacy of the Lincolns

ALBA’s Human Rights Film Festival shines a light on human rights abuses—and on those who try to stop them—wherever they may happen. The geography covered by this year’s Impugning Impunity is vast.
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American Mother Cries over Son Held Prisoner by Franco

July 27, 2016
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American Mother Cries over Son Held Prisoner by Franco

La Prensa was a Spanish language daily that thoroughly covered the Spanish Civil War, including occasional stories, like the heartbreaking one translated here, about the Lincolns. Spanish-language journalism in the US is a largely untapped source for the study of American involvement in the Spanish Civil War. Tuesday, October 19, 1937 ********************** He was...
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Americans in Spain’s Civil War: A Convoluted Legacy

July 25, 2016
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Americans in Spain’s Civil War: A Convoluted Legacy

James D. Fernandez, New York University Eighty years ago this week, in the Spanish North African enclave of Melilla, a group of right-wing generals staged a military coup, aimed at overthrowing Spain’s democratically elected government. The July 1936 uprising unleashed what would come to be known – somewhat inaccurately – as the Spanish Civil...
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Legible Legacies: A World without the Lincolns

June 9, 2016
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Legible Legacies: A World without the Lincolns

The legacy of the Spanish Civil War played a crucial role in the lives of Lydia Cacho and Jeremy Scahill, the winners of the ALBA/Puffin Award. But how do we ensure its transmission to younger generations, whose life world is so different that they often have trouble even reading the Lincolns’ hand-written letters? ALBA’s...
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Impugning Impunity: ALBA’s Human Rights Film Festival Denounces Violence and Inequality

December 8, 2015
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<i>Impugning Impunity: </i>ALBA’s Human Rights Film Festival Denounces Violence and Inequality

ALBA’s fifth annual Human Rights Film Festival featured 21 documentary films from 12 countries (four world premieres, 12 New York premieres). The Randall Award went to Among the Believers, about radical Islam and a charismatic cleric in Pakistan.
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Las maestras de la República

March 28, 2015
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Las maestras de la República

On behalf of NYU’s Department of Spanish Literature and Portuguese, the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, and the Abraham Lincoln Brigade...
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Untreated Memories: Franco’s Disappeared

March 13, 2015
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Untreated Memories: Franco’s Disappeared

Some 114,000 Spaniards lay in unmarked mass graves strewn all over the Iberian Peninsula. Only Cambodia has more densely populated killing fields. These are not men and women killed at the front during the Spanish Civil War (1936-39); they are victims of systematic extrajudicial assassinations carried out by Francoist forces during and after that...
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The Spanish Republic in Tampa, 1939

April 15, 2013
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The Spanish Republic in Tampa, 1939

On the 82 anniversary of the founding of the Spanish Republic, Appellate Court Judge, E.J. Salcines, tells a wonderful story about the Republican flag at Tampa’s Centro Asturiano. 14 April 2013, Salcines Park, West Tampa https://vimeo.com/64033205
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Host Workers or Guest Workers?

March 12, 2013
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Host Workers or Guest Workers?

A couple of weeks ago, Luis Argeo and I inaugurated a Facebook page that we hope will serve as a kind of dynamic storefront for a more staid and long-term scholarly and documentary project aimed at chronicling the history of Spanish immigration to the United States. This past Sunday, I posted on that FB...
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Combing the Present

March 6, 2013
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Combing the Present

Emilio Silva Faba was born in the town of Pereje (León) in 1892. In 1915 he emigrated to Argentina, where he lived in Ezpeleta, in the province of Buenos Aires. There he worked in a soda factory. Five years later he re-emigrated to the United States. He came through Ellis Island on August 28...
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