Adam Hochschild on Spain’s court of memory

April 15, 2014
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José María Galante, one of the Spanish torture victims who brought his case to the Argentine judiciary. Photo Jorge París.

José María Galante, one of the Spanish torture victims who brought his case to the Argentine judiciary. Photo Jorge París.

“In most countries, there is no statute of limitations for murder. Should there be one for torture?” Adam Hochschild asks in a New York Times op-ed today;

In Spain, neither charge can be brought against anyone who worked for the harsh, long-lasting regime of Francisco Franco, because of an amnesty law that eased the country’s transition to democracy after the dictator’s death in 1975. But the case of Antonio González Pacheco, a notorious torturer from the last years of Franco’s military rule, is raising thorny questions. A former prisoner named José María Galante was startled last year to discover that Mr. Pacheco, alive and spry enough at 67 to be a long-distance runner, was living not far from him in Madrid.

Read the whole piece here.

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