Reviews

Book review: The English captain

January 4, 2013
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Book review: The English captain

The Last English Revolutionary: Tom Wintringham, 1898-1949 (Brighton, Portland, Toronto: Sussex Academic Press, 2012), by Hugh Purcell with Phyll Smith. A very welcome “enlarged, revised and updated edition” of the biography of Tom Wintringham published originally in 2004.
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Book review: Toxic myths

January 4, 2013
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Book review: Toxic myths

The War and its Shadow: Spain’s Civil War in Europe’s Long Twentieth Century, by Helen Graham, Portland, OR: Sussex Academic Press, 2012. 250 pp. Many subjects thread through the pages of Helen Graham’s dense but brilliant meditation on the Spanish Civil War.
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Perpetrators on trial: The justice cascade

September 16, 2012
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Perpetrators on trial: The justice cascade

The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics, by Kathryn Sikkink (New York: Norton, 2011). One of the most shocking scenes in Mad Men, the popular TV series about the hard-drinking advertising scene of the 1960s, occurs in the pristine upstate New York countryside.
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Songs of Struggle: Horror and humanity

September 16, 2012
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Songs of Struggle: Horror and humanity

The Undying Flame: Ballads and Songs of the Holocaust, by Jerry Silverman. Jerry Silverman has written much more than a songbook. He brings to life the rise of fascism and the horror of the Holocaust in songs and text.
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Soccer and War: Whatever happens, the ball rolls on

September 15, 2012
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Soccer and War: Whatever happens, the ball rolls on

Some say soccer is politics and others consider it poetry. Jimmy Burns and Simon Kuper lay bare the connections between what happened on the European fields and the world around them.
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Papa & Marty at the movies: Hemingway & Gellhorn

September 15, 2012
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Papa & Marty at the movies: <em>Hemingway & Gellhorn</em>

At worst, Hemingway & Gellhorn is the best bad movie you'll see all year. It has two stars--Nicole Kidman and Clive Owens--at the top of their game and the chemistry between them incandesces. There’s a great supporting cast too: David Strathairn as the crushable John Dos Passos; Tony Shalhoub as Mikhail Koltsov, the Stalinist...
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Review: A British nurse in Spain

July 8, 2012
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Review: A British nurse in Spain

Patience Darton’s life is an encapsulation of some of the 20th century’s most critical moments. Without an ounce of didacticism, her life shows the reader the abiding truth of “the personal is political.” No didacticism then, just a truth rendered with grace and melancholy (wrenching understatement is Patience’s forte) and delivered in a way...
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Review: Frank Tinker, Mercenary Ace in the SCW

July 2, 2012
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Review: Frank Tinker, Mercenary Ace in the SCW

Smith, Richard K. and R. Cargill Hall.  Five Down, No Glory:  Frank G. Tinker, Mercenary Ace in the Spanish Civil War.  Naval Institute Press.  Oct. 2011.  377 pp.  illus.  Timeline.  Notes. index.  ISBN 978-1-61251-054-5.  $36.95. (Buy at Powells and support ALBA.) The reader will note from Five Down, No Glory’s introduction that this study...
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Review: Julian Bell from Bloomsbury to the SCW

July 2, 2012
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Review: Julian Bell from Bloomsbury to the SCW

Julian Bell: From Bloomsbury to the Spanish Civil War. By Peter Stansky and William Abrahams. Stanford University Press, 2012. (Buy at Powells and support ALBA.) In 1966, Peter Stansky and William Abrahams published Journey to the Frontier, which followed the lives of two young poets from families with strong intellectual and artistic backgrounds, both...
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The Spanish Holocaust: Reframing the Civil War

June 13, 2012
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The Spanish Holocaust: Reframing the Civil War

Names matter. Paul Preston’s choice of The Spanish Holocaust, his latest and most ambitious account of the massive violence unleashed in the wake of the 1936 coup, is as polemical as it is well-pondered. It reflects a conscious attempt on Preston’s part to reframe how we think about the war in Spain and its...
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