Features

Garzón: “Continue the fight for human rights, for human dignity, and against impunity”

May 15, 2011
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Garzón: “Continue the fight for human rights, for human dignity, and against impunity”

Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, members of ALBA, representatives of the Puffin Foundation, authorities, amigas y amigos: Seventy-five years ago in my country, Spain, one of the darkest and saddest chapters in the history of humanity began. It lasted more than forty years and even today, after 34 years of democracy, it has not...
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Picasso and Delaprée: new discoveries

April 20, 2011
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Picasso and Delaprée: new discoveries

I would like to add a note on Picasso's sketch on a copy of Paris-Soir of April 19th, 1937. Since my piece was published in The Volunteer I have come across some new information that links the evidence on Picasso's initial engagement with the Spanish Civil War at the end of 1936 and...
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Picasso, Louis Delaprée and the bombing of civilians

March 4, 2011
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Picasso, Louis Delaprée and the bombing of civilians

Although Picasso experts agree that the painter’s interest in the war as a subject was sparked some time in late 1936 or early 1937, the precise circumstances of the “conversion” that made the Guernica possible were never fully made clear—until now, that is. Last year, while preparing an edition of the Spanish Civil War...
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Bombs Over Madrid

November 23, 2010
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Bombs Over Madrid

What follows is not the laying of charges. It is a recording secretary’s deposition. I catalogue the ruins, count the dead, weigh up the spilled blood. I have seen all these images of the martyred city of Madrid that I will try to show you, although mostly they defy description. I do not care for propaganda tracts or...
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From Madrid to Guernica: Picasso, Louis Delaprée and the bombing of civilians, 1936-1937

November 23, 2010
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From Madrid to Guernica: Picasso, Louis Delaprée and the bombing of civilians, 1936-1937

Although Picasso experts agree that the painter’s interest in the war as a subject was sparked some time in late 1936 or early 1937, the precise circumstances of the “conversion” that made the Guernica possible were never fully made clear—until now, that is. Last year, while preparing an edition of the Spanish Civil War...
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Tribute to Baltasar Garzón

August 31, 2010
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Tribute to Baltasar Garzón

As Judge Baltasar Garzón faces a backlash that may cost him his position in Spain’s judiciary, ALBA invited María Blanco to give the keynote talk at the annual reunion of the Bay Area veterans and friends of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in Berkeley, California, on May 30, 2010. What follows is the full text...
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“Negrín was right.” An interview with Gabriel Jackson

August 31, 2010
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“Negrín was right.” An interview with Gabriel Jackson

After twenty-six years in Barcelona, one of the world’s most prominent historians of twentieth-century Spain has moved back to the United States. Few foreign scholars command the respect and authority that Gabriel Jackson enjoys in Spain. For the past decade, Jackson has been working on a major biography of Juan Negrín, the Republic’s Prime...
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Posted in Features, Interviews | 12 Comments »

Collective Memory, A Different Kind of DNA (Teruel, 1938-Derry, 1972)

July 8, 2010
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Collective Memory, A Different Kind of DNA (Teruel, 1938-Derry, 1972)

The morning of the publishing of the Saville Enquiry Report, June 15th 2010, I received an early call, from Elaine Brotherton, a close friend and niece of William McKinney, who was one of the thirteen men who shot dead by the British Army on January 30th 1972. The event became known to the world...
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Anatomy of a Lie: The Death of Oliver Law

June 1, 2010
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Anatomy of a Lie: The Death of Oliver Law

Oliver Law, the first Black American to command white troops in battle, was appointed on July 5, 1937 as commander of the Abraham Lincoln Battalion. According to eyewitness accounts of men under his command, Law died a hero’s death leading a charge against Francoist forces on Mosquito Hill at the Battle of Brunete on...
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Posted in Essays, Features | 13 Comments »

Truth in the Making: The Never-Ending Saga of Capa’s Falling Soldier

March 17, 2010
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Truth in the Making: The Never-Ending Saga of Capa’s Falling Soldier

This past July, around the 73rd anniversary of the outbreak of the Civil War and 11 days after the opening of a large Robert Capa exhibit at the Catalan National Museum of Art, the Barcelona news paper El Periódico de Catalunya published what was billed as a stun ning revelation: Capa’s legendary photograph of...
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